Mar 23, 2009

LA Times Daily Crossword

Tribune Media Service (TMS) has replaced the TMS Daily puzzle with LA Times Daily Crossword edited by Rich Norris starting March 23, 2008. The puzzle is printable from their website if you prefer solving on paper.

The puzzle is also available at Cruciverb.com in Across Lite format. You can download free Across Lite from NY Time's website.

The L.A. Times crossword appears in nearly 700 daily and Sunday newspapers in the U.S., India, Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Japan and Taiwan.

On a scale of 1-5, the level of difficulty for our Monday and Tuesday puzzle is 1, Wednesday is 2, Thursday and Friday 3, Saturday 4 and Sunday 3.

Updated on Sept 24, 2009: DIFFICULTY of daily puzzles can range from easy to moderate. In terms of The New York Times puzzle, that means no harder than Wednesday. Difficulty level of clues and fill for Saturday themeless should be similar to NYT Wednesday/Thursday. Sunday puzzles should be of moderate difficulty, similar to Tues/Weds NYT.

Please feel free to go to the Comments section at the end of each blog entry if you have any question.

C.C.

Added later: Besides LA Times and Chicago Tribune, these website carry LA Times Crossword as well. Feel free to email me if you find others.


1) American Mensa  (Ads free). Relatively stable. One glitch in the 2 times I tested.

2) Web Crossword. Not very reliable. Sometimes no new puzzles there.

3) Family Education (Ads free)

11 comments:

Neil said...

I feel like an abandoned step child. Really going to miss your helps. You have been commenting on a puzzle that we get in Idaho Statsman.

C. C. said...

Neil,
You can always go to LA Times website and print out the puzzle that I am blogging here if your paper now carries a different puzzle.

Mike said...

Our Incredible Shrinking Newspaper publishes the LAT crossword, in spite of the fact it's an "Affiliate of the New York Times Corp." They've only recently started printing the theme, if any, and then only on Sunday. So we have a small additional challenge -- not just to conform to the theme, but to find it in the first place. Often I see that there is a theme, but can't name it, so I come here, where all is revealed. Thank you.

I've been commenting anonymously now and then, but just remembered I do have a Google account, so will post under that name from now on. Expert solvers might have some fun figuring out my username's basis.

C. C. said...

Mike,
LA Times weekday puzzles have no titles. We make them up. Hope to hear from you often.

Johanna said...

In case you'd like to know:
Spoonerism comes from a Prof. Spooner at Harvard or Yale. He was famous for crossing the first letters of two words. Behind his back, his students were ridiculing him.
It was a great sport when I was in HS, 60 yrs ago, to think up funny ones.
Thanks for your solutions, I always go to you. I think it's amazing that you have such a great command of our language.

Johanna said...

If you would like to know:
Spoonerisms are named after a Prof. William Spoooner of Oxford, who was renowned for such slips of the tongue.

Sixty years ago when I was in HS it was a popular thing to do deliberately but of course, not to a teacher.
Thank you for your column.
I enjoy your solutions and am amazed at your command of our language.

Anonymous said...

LA Time 6/12 - I remember reading a Trogs album cover - 60's - and it explained what a troglodyte was and where they live. Go figure!

Barry said...

Hello. I don't know if this is the right place to leave a comment. Re the L.A. Times Crossword of 10/17/11, the clue is xis (47 Across). The word is nus. This is some sort of Greek word, supposedly. Sorry, but nusxis ain't a word. Can anyone help me out? Best, Barry.

Argyle said...

No, Barry, this isn't the right place to post a comment...but we gotcha covered. Click here for the right place. There you will find that NU and XI are, in that order, letters in the Greek alphabet. A little tough for a Monday but we had a similar clue/answer last week.

Anonymous said...

Sun Aug 31 puzzle... 11 across... ASTA was a wire-fox terrier... NOT a Schnauzer....

Argyle said...

11. Schnauzer of fiction : ASTA is correct. In the book (fiction), Asta was a schnauzer.

In "The Thin Man (film) Asta was a terrier...and a scene stealer.

There are many major differences between the book and the film, including who the thin man was.